legs-are-just-for-show:

replaying the same level in a video game for the hundredth time

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(via humblyloyalmcbranch)

So I finally started playing Bravely Default today…

my emotions

I’ve barely scratched the surface of this game and I’m in love with all of these dorks what is this no one warned me about all of these feels I’d be having and  AAAHHHHHHHH

And of course my computer decides that the one day I actually need it for serious things, it’s going to have a string of heart attacks and be slow as shit. 

Fuck everything right now.

thunderboltsortofapenny:

recoveringfrommyconvictions:

gaymerboy99:

littlelionmonster:

oldmanstephanie:

"Fuck You, Old People" — Group Piece at CUPSI 2014

"By the way, you can’t actually pick yourself up by your own bootstraps. That’s now how physics works."

FUCK. YES.

this gives me life….

"Act your fucking age" god damn, this has a good message here.

39 seconds in and I reblogged it

(via shadowofthelamp)

cptstvrgrs:

avengers au where clint’s got his hearing aids but he turns them off when hes bored so that he can try to decipher what everyones saying
and no one knows he does it but they think its weird when he misses huge gaps of a story or throws in an oddly specific detail that never happened or gets a name really wrong on an official report
tony and nat try to piece together whats happening through increasingly convoluted ways that may result in more than a few injuries
steves convinced its just something left over from when loki was in his head and he keeps trying to get sam to talk to him about it
bruce starts trying to develop a new hearing aid that’ll register the sound better (clint accepts them and then proceeds to continue turning those ones off too)
and then one day thor’s telling a story about loki’s embarrassing childhood and he just offhandedly says ‘tell barton to turn his ears on, he will like the next part’ and the room just goes quiet as they realize theres absolutely nothing wrong with clint hes just been being a shit the entire time

(via bluandorange)

sharkylookingthing:

raise a toast to the magi, protectors new and old.

inspired by a conversation with my friend, journeysquad. please fullview them! the madokarita is resized horribly in the preview.

(via bluequartz)

Why what you do doesn’t seem important, but actually is

mars-maggie:

When I was in college, I had a wonderful mentor/professor who helped me learn lessons that keep being relevant as I go through life—which, if you ask me, is the tell-tale sign that he was a great professor.

One of those lessons was that it could be almost impossible to establish self-worth, and to recognize self-acheivement. After we’ve learned how to do something—ANYTHING—really well, it seems almost like second nature for us to do it. Even if we’re producing quality work, we look at it and think ‘well, sure this turned out well but anyone out there could have done it if they put the time in.’ We forget that WE are the ones that put the time in to learn the skill, and that WE are the ones who now have something special for it.

Here’s an example:

This professor told me about a time when he was at a conference giving a talk. After he was done with his seminar (which was probably about something awesome like chaotic oscillators) he went on to listen to other professors and industry professionals give their talks. There was one he was sitting on, thinking to himself ‘WOW this guy is cool. Here he is building a genetic search engine (or some other incredible topic) while I’m just dorking around with chaotic oscillators.’ but then, after the talk, my professor went up to him. He wanted to tell him how neat he found the subject and the guys research… And when he got up there, the guy went ‘OH WOW you are that professor with the chaotic oscillators! I saw your seminar and I was so excited by it! You’re really doing something incredible while I’m just dorking around with genetic search engines.’ And thats when my professor realized that JUST BECAUSE THINGS SEEM COMMON TO US DOESN’T MEAN THAT THEY ARE COMMON. Our skills, our lessons, and our experiences are unique to each of us, we just are looking at them through the fogged glass of ‘been there, done that.’ Others won’t be looking at them through that same glass.

If you ever see artwork and say ‘wow I wish mine was that good,’ or read a story and say ‘gee I wish that I could write like that,’ you have to also remember that there is probably someone out there saying the same exact thing about your work to themselves. It might even be the exact same person who you’re envying.

Please never forget that your experiences have made your own work into something valuable. YOU have put the time into it. YOU have something unique. YOU have something that it would take somebody else at least as long to duplicate, and it would still never come out the same way that you do it.

We fixate so often on comparing ourselves to other people, but we judge ourselves the most unfairly. We look at what they have, and we fret about what we don’t have, and we forget that we aren’t defined by what we don’t have.

Your work is important, and it is only going to get more important from here.

(via bemusedlybespectacled)

upperstories:

quarteralert:

upperstories:

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I’ve heard it too many times to ignore it.

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(via pernicious-pencil)

Final vacation photo tally: 3.82GB or 1412 pictures.

And that was with a cruddy camera battery that kept dying on me.

tisfan:

everyworldneedslove:

darthstitch:

markoruffalo:

What’s interesting about good and moral people is that they actually have to try and function in a word that isn’t. And the older you get, the more interesting that becomes. Because it’s also the hardest thing to do in the world. (x) (x)

#yes #yes this so very much #it’s easy to be an asshole in a world full of assholes #especially when you have/had a shit life and have/had some nasty shit happened to you #but to still be kind #not to waver #to stay who you are #is a very hard thing to do #it’s easy to love #and it’s easy to hate #but it takes strength to be gentle and kind #and this is why every single superhero in the marvel universe looks up to steve #clint said it himself #steve brings out the best out of people #when you’re around steve you want to do what’s right because of the sheer power of steve’s goodness #oh god  #steve i love you so much it actually pains me please send help

And this is why I love Steve Rogers and I refuse to buy into this crap that “writing Good Guys is boring” and “let’s grim him up a bit, make him more into Grim Brooding Dark Superhero Name Here, that’ll be interesting.” 

Writing Good Guys is never boring. 

The ridiculous thing about Steve Rogers is that he is everything that is brave, earnest and true.  And no, he’s not perfect, he’s not a saint, he’s sassy and snarky and occasionally trips face first into the Land of Adorkable. (All right, maybe not occasionally.  Maybe all the flippin’ time.)  But good is awesome.  Good rocks.  Good doesn’t mean soft and weak and boring.  

Doing the Right Thing is hard and it hurts like a sumbitch at times and you’ll get crap thrown at you every which way but Steve Rogers keeps going and somehow manages to stay kind and still be this sweetheart, despite everything else that would’ve broken other people long ago.  

Somehow you read about Steve being playful and pretending that he doesn’t understand modern technology but is probably the biggest techie geek there is.  You read about Steve saving puppies and kittens and telling a wide-eyed six year old girl that she can be Captain America when she grows up if she wants to be.  You read about Steve charming little old ladies and respecting the hell out of women in general and you can bet your ass he’s not some chauvinistic asshole with entitlement issues.  You read about skinny Steve and you realize Captain America’s always been in him, even when he didn’t have the strength to match that superhero heart of his.  You read about Steve trolling the hell out of his teammates and Tony goes “SON OF A BITCH WHO KNEW?!” and Clint cackles over and over because this is rich, this is awesome, Captain America’s a little trolling shit and PHIL DID YOU SEE THAT?

And Bucky would’ve told him, Steve’s always been a punk, didn’t you fellas know that?

And the Howling Commandos would’ve had some stories about their crazy C.O. and the shenanigans he came up with and that Steve ran a mixed-race unit with a couple of soldiers from not even in the US ARMY and took no guff from anyone who complained about that

And Natasha doesn’t ever get disappointed in this good man, when she’s been disappointed by so many so called “good men” and she starts to believe.

And that’s the Steve Rogers story I’ll never get tired of reading.  Or writing. 

Fuck boring.  Steve Rogers will never be boring.  He’s my hero too. 

Did I reblog this already? I don’t care because IT GOT BETTER.

“Imaginary evil is romantic and varied; real evil is gloomy, monotonous, barren, boring. Imaginary good is boring; real good is always new, marvelous, intoxicating.”

― Simone Weil

(Source: lockelamorashasmoved, via bemusedlybespectacled)